Most inhabitants of the western hemisphere are well aware of the apocalyptic setting that frequents many popular films and novels. An apocalypse foments ideas of a destitute environment—a once abundantly populated region consumed by silence and disarray—an atmosphere reeking of unfinished business and unstated sentiments— beds that once warmly embraced human bodies in scraps— a vacant street echoing of silent cries and last breaths. What does not accompany this apocalyptic setting is how it subtly reinforces white supremacy. An apocalyptic setting selectively omits the reality embedded in its depiction. Namely, a world soiled with death and deterioration overtly composes western hell, but readily consumes a reality for those both within and beyond America. However, despite this truth, the pending Trump presidency is frequently referred to as a western apocalypse—illustrating the apocalyptic concept as both convenient and strategic.Rendering Trump’s election as an apocalypse sparked a series of reactionary responses— much of which operated under revolutionary intention. For example, many opted not to vote. Abstaining contains revolutionary potential, however, much of those who abstained, abstained solely for this election. To abstain from this election suggests that this election presented a dynamic different from previous elections. Despite the drastic effort conveyed in media portrayals, the democratic party essentially ran the same candidate twice. However, the 2016 election is far from the first demonstration of said behavior. Both the democratic and republican party work to maintain white supremacy, though they do so through a varied approach. Namely, during the 2016 debate Clinton and Trump, in many instances offered identical answers. Their similarities did not just manifest in the debate, but in a friendship thoroughly documented through years of a high profiled affiliation. Yet despite the constant overlap and affiliation, many remain adamant that the two personify oil and vinegar. This depiction not only evokes social amnesia of historical trajectory, but a societal ignorance that is overly invested appearance and overt behavior.

Rendering Trump’s election as an apocalypse sparked a series of reactionary responses— much of which operated under revolutionary intention. For example, many opted not to vote. Abstaining contains revolutionary potential, however, much of those who abstained, abstained solely for this election. To abstain from this election suggests that this election presented a dynamic different from previous elections. Despite the drastic effort conveyed in media portrayals, the democratic party essentially ran the same candidate twice. However, the 2016 election is far from the first demonstration of said behavior. Both the democratic and republican party work to maintain white supremacy, though they do so through a varied approach. Namely, during the 2016 debate Clinton and Trump, in many instances offered identical answers. Their similarities did not just manifest in the debate, but in a friendship thoroughly documented through years of a high profiled affiliation. Yet despite the constant overlap and affiliation, many remain adamant that the two personify oil and vinegar. This depiction not only evokes social amnesia of historical trajectory, but a societal ignorance that is overly invested appearance and overt behavior.It strikes me as largely problematic, yet convenient for the general public to grant a man who has yet to take the oath as president such power. How is one man responsible for uprooting an entire nation? Simply put, he is not. However, in citing Trump as the catalyst for culture conflict that never truly evaporated, oblivion supersedes responsibility. Rather than acknowledging the systemic practices of racism that subtly infiltrate every aspect of western society, it is convenient to portray racism as a new phenomenon induced by a force or singular entity embodied by Donald Trump. Trump was not president when Dr. Charles Drew was denied a blood transfusion on his deathbed, when fourteen-year-old George Stinney was convicted and sentenced to capital punishment despite no evidence to support his conviction, when Emmitt Till was brutally murdered, when George Jackson was given ten years for a petty “crime,” or when Trayvon Martin’s murderer was acquitted. What does hover over all of these occurrences is white

It strikes me as largely problematic, yet convenient for the general public to grant a man who has yet to take the oath as president such power. How is one man responsible for uprooting an entire nation? Simply put, he is not. However, in citing Trump as the catalyst for culture conflict that never truly evaporated, oblivion supersedes responsibility. Rather than acknowledging the systemic practices of racism that subtly infiltrate every aspect of western society, it is convenient to portray racism as a new phenomenon induced by a force or singular entity embodied by Donald Trump. Trump was not president when Dr. Charles Drew was denied a blood transfusion on his deathbed, when fourteen-year-old George Stinney was convicted and sentenced to capital punishment despite no evidence to support his conviction, when Emmitt Till was brutally murdered, when George Jackson was given ten years for a petty “crime,” or when Trayvon Martin’s murderer was acquitted. What does hover over all of these occurrences is white supremacy. Thus, it matters not who physically sits in the president’s seat. White supremacy, as a systemic practice, operates perniciously.  Its ability to operate without question occurs because not enough understand the intricacies of such a deeply embedded system. Ignorance and social amnesia seduces the general public to forget what history teaches us in patterns of injustice.Trump will lead the same country that began on thievery. The country that tricked and killed off the indigenous to steal their land, then eventually invented a term called “immigrants” to conceptualize everyone but themselves—America’s first immigrants. A country of stolen labor and a destiny manifested on false superiority. Donald Trump personifies the very principles that founded this nation. Yet, Trump proves an embarrassment to some because he reminds the western world what President Obama lured us to forget. President Obama symbolically embodied the

Trump will lead the same country that began on thievery. The country that tricked and killed off the indigenous to steal their land, then eventually invented a term called “immigrants” to conceptualize everyone but themselves—America’s first immigrants. A country of stolen labor and a destiny manifested on false superiority. Donald Trump personifies the very principles that founded this nation. Yet, Trump proves an embarrassment to some because he reminds the western world what President Obama lured us to forget. President Obama symbolically embodied the unkept American promise. His symbolic presence hypnotized much of the black community and allowed those of the majority to feel as if they were not racist by casting a ballot for him. President Obama proved a gateway to a silent forgiveness and false unity that fomented white supremacy while seeming to dissolve it. Trump will undoubtedly function as the “anti-Obama.” Namely, Trump will function to prove the world a better place when detached from a black president. He will most likely culminate this journey due to the low expectations that surround his pending presidency. Furthermore, Trump reminds America of the stench in the air merely masked with a well-educated and polished fragrance.
Yet many conversations following the recent election focus on the singular idea that we are “on the brink of the disaster.” As an aspiring academic I consistently hear that President-elect Donald Trump “opened the door” for offensive speech and behavior. In hearing these comments and countless others of the same origin My question to those possessing these comments is simply—what America has everyone else been living in?
The answer to this query is two-fold. There is one group that actually buys into the symbols and believes that the world has truly evolved because non-whites acquired conventional success previously only attained by the majority. There is a second group that casually disregards the suffering occurring out of their overt range of privilege. Commonly, both factions personify a social amnesia that foments white supremacy by encouraging oppressed groups to forget and the non-oppressed groups to ignore. These behaviors eerily mirror the Disney World dynamic. One group believes in the magic of the fictive characters and pretty allusions, and the other group believes they are these magical characters reigning over a fictive yet gated community. Conceptualizing Disney Land to encompass the apex of childhood imagination allows the average adult to overlook similar allusions present in their mundane activities.
Similarly,  those who appear to vehemently oppose Trump silently abide by his implication that America was at a point in time “great.” Countries designated “ third world” are commonly depicted as “suffering” with nearly nude children, malnourished and enduring subpar living conditions. These depictions conveniently omit that much of this suffering results from western influence. However, as long as these conditions exists—the western world has a binary opposite that aids in maintaining a false superiority. It is seemingly okay for certain factions to suffer if it proves us greater in comparison. However, when factions that traditionally operate from a position of privilege seem on the brink of disaster, the world is suddenly disastrous. Thus, much of those “appalled” or “disgusted” by the Trump election actually reinforce the very practices they appear to refute.
I am personally thankful to Trump for unveiling the true state of the union. The confusion and blissful ignorance that composes much of the western psyche has never been so real. Furthermore, the fight to be on the “right” side of history exposed a world of wrongs. While this exposure seduces many to believe that the world will only get worse, this exposure grants me an optimism I did not have before the election. I will be honest, I am not sure things will get better. I am not even sure what “better” looks like for America, but for black America “better” manifests in existing outside of the western consoles that continue to hold us hostage. I hope that the “overt” racism will scare us straight back into out majestic roots, or our pre-integration mindset where we bought, produced and lived black. Some may refute my picture of unity, but you cannot love and appreciate others if your cannot love and appreciate your collective self.

Love could not trump hate because pseudo sentiments cannot trump truth. Thus, while many regard the 2016 election as a contemporary apocalypse, I feel as though it will be a platform for a new beginning. I can only hope that Trump will steer blacks away from his-story and encourage us to relish in our own.

May Trump, as a human personification of white supremacy, present the necessary exposure to enlighten those lost in the American allusion. Moreover, may Trump be the tragedy that forces us to see the collateral beauty in ourselves.