Good News for the Black Collective

  • A Platform for Positive Black Media

kweli.tv offers a streaming surface anchored in films produced by black people for a black audience. The platform serves as a means to combat the negative portrayals of black people that continue to dominate black portrayals in white media. With almost all of their content garnered from black film festivals, Kweli, Swahili for truth, proves a solid means for the black collective to indulge in the beauty of black culture—unsullied by whites.

PS: It’s monthly membership is also cheaper than Netflix!

  • Essence Returns to Black Ownership

After years of representing the black female perspective from as a branch of Time Inc coperation, Essence is once-again black owned. Although owned by Sundail Brand founder Richelieu Dennis, who recently sold Shea Moisure, Dennis has relinquished one pillar in black economics to own another. While my feelings towards the gesture remain ambivalent, I am very happy that a publication that has been a staple in the black community as long as Essence has is back to black ownership!

  • Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow is banned in New Jersey prisons 

Many are probably wondering why this one made the list. One, the issue is not so much that the book was (temporarily)  banned, but that folks did not see this coming. Jersey, in the arrest and inhumane treatment of our beloved Assata Shakur, has already illustrated its cowardly combat to take down blacks who refute their systemic domination. Thus, Alexander’s efforts to tell the full story of incarceration, also proves a threat to a system who benefits on the ignorance of the masses.

Thus, despite eventually  being deemed unconstitutional, the initial band on a much needed narrative on contemporary colonialism,  illustrates that you’ve done something very right, when white institutions fear your influence.

This also illustrates that while withheld from those detained in the New Jersey prison system, those of us not detained have no excuse not to indulge in the informative text.  In a perfect world, everyone in the collective would read a copy and send a copy to an incarcerated member of the collective.

But in an imperfect world, this bad news will prove good for Alexander’s book sales.

Miss Alexander, I take my hat off to you!

Moral: It’s not about being anything but pro-black!

Cheers to 2018 as another year of black excellence!

 

Black Power ❤

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Until the lion has a historian, the hunter will always be a hero-Chinua Achebe Twitter: @womanistwriter Email: whispersofawomanist@gmail.com E-Portfolio:catherinecsaunders.weebly.com

5 thoughts on “Good News for the Black Collective

  1. Excellent post. My stepfather has worked on prison rape reform in the prison system towards the end of his career. The stories he’s shared with me throughout his career in human service inspire me to not quit my current situation. This passage you wrote: Many are probably wondering why this one made the list. One, the issue is not so much that the book was (temporarily)  banned, but that folks did not see this coming. Jersey, in the arrest and inhumane treatment of our beloved Assata Shakur, has already illustrated its cowardly combat to take down blacks who refute their systemic domination. Thus, Alexander’s efforts to tell the full story of incarceration, also proves a threat to a system who benefits on the ignorance of the masses.
    Thus, despite eventually  being deemed unconstitutional, the initial band on a much needed narrative on contemporary colonialism,  illustrates that you’ve done something very right, when white institutions fear your influence.-that’s it. Systemic oppression and dehumanization perpetuate violence. Knowledge is power but at first it’s enraging, especially if you’ve been abused and find yourself in a cage. I do not support book banning just to be clear, but I get why the man wants to block access. I’m just curious as to why this book and why now. I love your resilient reframe. I’ll have to check out Kweli tv.

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