What O J Teaches The Black Collective

Richard Wright’s Native Son is a haunting narrative that although technically fiction, renders a factual discourse regarding the black male body and criminality. Born into the crime of poverty, the novel’s protagonist Bigger is eventually tried and sentenced for the death of heiress Mary Dalton— a woman he accidentally murdered in a paralyzing fear. This…

The Beyoncé Wax Figure: White-Washing and the Blind Gaze

A wax figure of global star Beyoncé made headlines this week for its supposed white– washing of the talented star. The figure– fair-skinned with a pinkish undertones, small features and the star’s famous long blonde locks, offended many who believed the stature resembled an unknown white woman and not the beloved pop star. The outrage…

R. Kelly: Sexual Predator or Scapegoat?

I anticipate that this post will be unpopular. I acknowledge the contention that my assertions will certainly prompt and welcome the scathing comments in the section below. With that being said, I still very must feel that my perspective is worthy of articulation and exposure to those that care to listen. … Singer and R&B…

Blac Chyna—A Black Female Pedestal for White Female Supremacy

A Repost from an article I wrote for For Harriet: http://www.forharriet.com/2017/07/blac-chyna-black-female-pedestal-for.html#axzz4n7LNa9eM Angela White, the public figure known to many as Blac Chyna, has maintained a consistent place in contemporary media because of her relationship with Robert “Rob” Kardashian Jr.. Kardashian, unlike his famous family, has spent much of the last few years out of the limelight….

Dr. Umar Johnson: The Man, the Myth and the Ego

Dr. Umar Johnson possesses an elevated ability to verbalize the significance of a collective in an individualistic world. Johnson garners much of his praise for addressing the non-academic audience with critical ideas typically deemed esoteric for colloquial settings. Most recently, Johnson appeared on the Power 105.1 Breakfast Club and News One with Roland Martin. His…

Bakari Henderson, A Casualty of Global Racial Supremacy

When I was seventeen years old, I was presented with an opportunity to journey to Amsterdam with a group of white girls from my graduating class. My father vehemently opposed the trip, something I resented for years in my inability to fully conceptualize his apprehension. Twelve years later, I find myself revisiting “what could have…

“The Story of OJ” as the Theme Song to Pseudo Consciousness

Rapper Jay Z, who this piece will refer to by his given name Shawn Carter, provides a formidable discourse for contemporary “wokeness” on his new track “The Story of OJ.” Carter begins his popular new track “The Story of OJ” with the following: OJ’s like ‘I’m not black I’m OJ’ ‘Okay’ In a new track “The…

Why the Serena Williams Vanity Fair Cover Image Bothers Me

Aside from her bead- clad cornrow days, I have not seen Serena Williams on the court. Instead, I solely saw Williams on award shows where she seemed a caricatured version of a black female, clad in an unflattering, inauthentic hair fit for female impersonators and clothes that drew attention to her muscles, or physical hardness…

The Angry Black Woman Part II: The Color of Criminality

Margaret Garner—a name unknown to many, encapsulates an early portrait of black female criminality. Garner, an enslaved black female subjected to cruel and frequent attacks on a southern plantation, planned an escape that would eliminate her and her family from the cruelty of her earthly master. She would never reach freedom, and upon her return…

Decrypting The Sociopathy of the Oppressed

Hollywood Whitney Elizabeth Houston was once a shining light of American culture. She was beautiful and unbelievably talented. Her voice possessed an unearthly perfection that serenaded the entire world. With songs like “How Will I know,” and “ I Want to Dance with somebody,” Houston was pop culture royalty. But her reign would eventually turn…