Girls Trip, a “Trip” to Feminism

The rise of the black female leading lady remains a consistent topic of discussion in the contemporary world. Once solely assigned supporting roles, black female portrayal has seemingly shifted. Or has it? Girls Trip  depicts four black female stars: Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith, Regina Hall and Tiffany Haddish. To the casual gaze, the black female…

All Eyes on Me, A Review

On the surface, Tupac was a young man with big dreams who wished to find a way out of a dead end street where so many black families and individuals dwell indefinately. To those that looked more closely, Tupac was a black man on a mission to be heard, a black man with a story…

Why I Will Not be Seeing Wonder Woman 

I almost did it. I selected a theatre and even looked up showtimes. As I began to mentally assemble my outfit and rework my schedule to accommodate viewing the film, I realized that I was all too familiar with this story. Wonder Woman is yet another page in the consistent white female narrative designed to…

Why the “Get Out” Alternative Ending is Better for Blacks

Yesterday, a number of sites featured the alternative ending for box office smash “Get Out.” The current ending features film protagonist Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) choking his once girlfriend (Alison Williams) when a cop car pulls up. Chris raises his hands in surrender, but the body that emerges from the car is Chris’s TSA employed friend…

Everything, Everything: A Review

I always liked Amandla Stenberg. As Rue from The Hunger Games, she was convincing, sweet, strong and cute. Her beauty was and is both striking and comforting. So when she blossomed into what appeared to be an intellectual and activist, she seemed a stroke of hope for the post-millennial generation. But in hindsight, I see…

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, A Review

The story of Henrietta Lacks is the narrative of black femininity. Lacks mirrors the exposed and dismembered Saartje Baartman in life and death exploitation, embodying the dehumanization and carelessness faced by countless black female bodies in traditional and contemporary settings. Yet, to some, the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a resounding work of…

Unforgettable, A Review

Unforgettable is a contemporary thriller that uses a traditional formula to stealthily depict societal anxieties around othered assimilation into traditionally white spaces. The film opens with Julia’s (Rosario Dawson), job departure. Following her engagement to financier turned entrepreneur David (Geoff Stults), she moves into the San Francisco Bay Area where she feels outcasted among the…

The Beauty of the Beast

Beauty and the Beast starring Hogwarts alumni Emma Watson proves an allegorical commentary on race. The age old story of an arrogant prince humbled by an unassuming sorceress seemingly illustrates the power of true love, but covertly depicts blackness as birthed from unfortunate circumstances and cured by the “beauty” of white femininity. At best, the…

Get Out, A Review (Spoilers)

Jordan Peele’s directorial debut Get Out proves a fascinating engagement with the racial truths of the contemporary world. The film centers on interracial couple Chris and Rose who are traveling to meet Rose’s parents in a New York City Suburb. Prior to their visit, Chris asks Rose if she told her parents that he is…

Why Moonlight Won Best Picture…

Even prior to receiving the highest honor of Sunday evening’s ceremony, Moonlight acquired abundant acclaim. The film, while praised for its narrative of a black gay male, encompasses a duality that warrants its acceptance by the The Academy. On the surface, Moonlight tells the story of “Little” a young black man born into less than…

I Am Not Your Negro, A Review

James Baldwin’s “I am Not Your Negro” succeeds in bridging past and present racial truths earning them a much deserved place in contemporary conversation. One of the most troubling ideologies of contemporary culture is the belief that the turmoil afforded to black life, is isolated, or new. The films succeeds in drawing the necessary connection…

The Hidden Message of the Hidden Figures Film and Others Like It

It seems most fitting to begin this piece by stating that mathematician Katherine Johnson is a genius. Thus, a movie celebrating black brilliance sounds progressive, however the actual portrayal renders Johnson a “hidden figure” in a supposed commemoration of her legacy. The film briefly shows audiences a young Katherine, whose academic ability foments opportunity despite…