What O J Teaches The Black Collective

Richard Wright’s Native Son is a haunting narrative that although technically fiction, renders a factual discourse regarding the black male body and criminality. Born into the crime of poverty, the novel’s protagonist Bigger is eventually tried and sentenced for the death of heiress Mary Dalton— a woman he accidentally murdered in a paralyzing fear. This…

The Beyoncé Wax Figure: White-Washing and the Blind Gaze

A wax figure of global star Beyoncé made headlines this week for its supposed white– washing of the talented star. The figure– fair-skinned with a pinkish undertones, small features and the star’s famous long blonde locks, offended many who believed the stature resembled an unknown white woman and not the beloved pop star. The outrage…

Dr. Umar Johnson: The Man, the Myth and the Ego

Dr. Umar Johnson possesses an elevated ability to verbalize the significance of a collective in an individualistic world. Johnson garners much of his praise for addressing the non-academic audience with critical ideas typically deemed esoteric for colloquial settings. Most recently, Johnson appeared on the Power 105.1 Breakfast Club and News One with Roland Martin. His…

BET Award Highlights and Why BET is NOT for Black People

Before I continue, I feel obliged to mention that I refuse to watch this awards show since the network saw fit to invite non-black artists to perform and neglect to honor our fallen contributors. This post serves as an analysis of newsworthy moments and current propaganda surrounding the festivities of yesterday evening. Remy Ma Wins…

Remembering Michael Jackson

Despite his unmatched contribution to music, conversations surrounding the late but great Michael Jackson often speak of one or two things: His child molestation charges His desire to “unblacken” himself Ironically, it is Jackson’s reduction to the core traits as magnified by the white media that paints him as a portrait of a caricatured blackness….

Why I Will Not be Seeing Wonder Woman 

I almost did it. I selected a theatre and even looked up showtimes. As I began to mentally assemble my outfit and rework my schedule to accommodate viewing the film, I realized that I was all too familiar with this story. Wonder Woman is yet another page in the consistent white female narrative designed to…

Chris Brown,Welcome to My Life: A Review

I am unsure where or when I first heard of Chris Brown. I do recall being blown away by his talent—each single bringing more fun and better dance moves than the one before. Brown, just a year my junior, easily sings the soundtrack to my coming of age narrative. I particularly remember his “In My…

The UnBreakable Kimmy Schmidt and The Quest For Black Female Erasure

Much of the contemporary conversations surrounding black women in the contemporary world centers on the rising popularity of biracial women, and their placement in roles for black women. Conversations regarding how and why this problem manifests so frequently prove far less common. Perhaps Netflix’s The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt best answers this unasked question. On the…

Naturi Naughton and the Black Body’s Plight to Overcome Rejection

A video clip of former 3LW members Adrienne Bailon and Naturi Naughton reunited on Daytime Talk show The Real surfaced this week, inciting many to question the authenticity of the now the popular apology.  In the clip, co-host Adrienne Bailon offers an apology to former band member Naturi Naughton who was eliminated from the group…

The People versus O.J. Simpson, A Review

My insomnia makes Netflix an common late-night companion. Over the past week, my insomnia streak acquainted me with recent Netflix series The People v. OJ Simpson. The popular series produced by Hollywood veteran and controversial scientologist John Travolta, takes viewers back to the 1995 trial where former NFL star OJ Simpson faced criminal charges for…

Dear White People, A Netflix Series Review

With its contentious title and Netflix uproar, Dear White People premiered  to a reception unmatched by its competitors. Namely, Dear White People was deemed revolutionary before the first episode aired, due to the belief that if it pissed white people off that it must be successful. I suppose that this contention was an essential component to…