Remembering Malcolm X

I have spent the bulk of today, reading Malcolm X quotes, and listening to his speeches. His smooth, precise, passionate speech personifies the poetic prose of black power personified. He is “our shining prince” as they say, in both life and death. He shines because his internal freedom bleeds outward. Yet, this year, perhaps more […]

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The Donald Glover Cover

  FX’s Atlanta presents what is largely missing from black portrayal—an unadulterated portrayal of black life.  The series does not feature picturesque characters  of the cookie cutter  sort. Though the series lead Earn (OG) is a Princeton graduate  and in real-life Paper Boi (Brian Tyree Henry) is a Yale graduate—the series captures a narrative that […]

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Extended Deadline: Call For Submissions

Call for Papers Fire: The Second Edition (Title in progress pending copyright)  Catherine C. Saunders: Editor In honor of the 92nd year since the first and only issue of Fire: Devoted to the Younger Negro Artist, this upcoming project seeks to pay homage to writer and editor Wallace Thurman and the black creative in producing […]

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Remembering Activist Darren Seals

Introduction George Washington. Thomas Jefferson. Christopher Columbus. These are just a few of the white men history remembers favorably–despite their unfavorable actions. Washington was a slave owner. Jefferson was a rapist. Columbus was a thief. Yet,  the date of their earthly arrival remains a national celebration. Those of us subject to the contemporary enslavement enabled by […]

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Breaking In, A Review

To be honest, Breaking In did not even bear much of a promise in its promos. By this, I speak specifically to the banality of the promotional images, not the talent of the featured melanated actors. Nevertheless, the allure of a black leading lady was enough to fill theatre seats with black women and black […]

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A Note To The Unconventional Mother

She wasn’t there on birthdays, or Christmas. In fact, I am not sure once they reached adolescence if they even remembered her face. Though I hope they did. I hope that when they reached deep inside themselves for memories the institution told them to forget, they saw her-her full Afro. That in deafening silence they […]

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Race, Space, and Articulated Anguish

Allow me to set the scene…. It was a spring day in Oakland, California and a black mother, diligently working on her degree was summoned to campus to tend to some collegiate business. She brought her son along with her, who was on a state-designated break at the time. She positioned him with lunch, a […]

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