Daunte’s Inferno

Grandma Tilson, I’m afraid of hell. Ain’t nothing to fear, there’s hell on earth. I mean the real her where you can go when you die.  You ain’t gotta die to go to the real hell. No? Uh uh, you just gotta sell that silver mirror God propped up in your soul. Sell it to…

The Elephant in the Gorilla Glue Scenario

I write this piece as a follow up to my previous post that articulates an overview of the complexities harbored in the Gorilla Glue story. In this brief post, I seek to reference the elephant in the room. While some question why the gorilla glue story was news, others have taken it upon themselves to…

Gorilla Glue, Gorilla Who?

As an African in America, I can honestly say that a part of me dreads black history month. For many, this month offsets a black year with a celebration of the motivational forces of a black past and present, but the anti-black world employs black history month as a platform to assault the African in…

The HBCU: Bleaching the Black University

This week, Howard University reported that it has a new Editor-in-chief, a title the university awarded to a woman of Asian descent. As editor-in-chief, this non-black woman of color will assume responsibility for the university’s Magazine. What stands out most about this appointment is the word “storyteller.” For centuries, the HBCU has authored a significant…

The Violence of the Visual

In her text The Invention of Woman, Oyeronke Oyewumi critically interrogates a visual American culture and its perpetual effect on identity markers that encompass many at birth. Engaging with Oyeyemi’s work elucidates that the visual, in many instances, is the beginning and end to understanding for many. The power of the visual is perhaps most…

The Problem with Whiteness as Privilege

Few things prove as exasperating as the term “white privilege.” The term marks a neo-liberalist attempt to gentrify the “woke” movement. The word proves a facile attempt to encapsulate and expose the inequities of whiteness. Asserting whiteness as a privilege, however, “privileges” the term. Whiteness is not a privilege, it is an act of terrorism….

Language, Lies, and Subversive Supremacy

Those within the black Diaspora must pay close attention to the language employed to convey what the media continues to posit as tragedy. The articles that “cover” black murder by the solders of white supremacy commonly indicate whether the slain were “unarmed” and or “have not committed a crime.” What this language articulates is that…

Be Careful what You Wish For, Re-Presentation and 2020

2020 began with the devastating death of Kobe Bryant and his teenage daughter Gianna. What still permeates my memory is how Bryant’s parents attended his public memorial to no acknowledgment. Their omission delineated a poignant truth: that the black optic attains its status following a complete uprooting from its origins. Then, we watched COVID birth…

What Will His Story Remember About the Year 2020?

His story will remember this year for everything it wasn’t. The question the confused will ask years from now is: where were you during the performative gestures that inundated 2020? The appropriate question is: where were you before? Where were you before an anti-black media told you it was okay to stand up and speak…

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, A Black Female Perspective

Amidst career-defining roles, Academy-Award Winner Viola Davis, and the late Chadwick Boseman in perhaps his most poignant role yet, is the power of the immortal black writer. The feat of writers like August Wilson is that they implement the colonial language as a way to liberate the black voice from systemized silence. Wilson fills this…