Bakari Henderson, A Casualty of Global Racial Supremacy

When I was seventeen years old, I was presented with an opportunity to journey to Amsterdam with a group of white girls from my graduating class. My father vehemently opposed the trip, something I resented for years in my inability to fully conceptualize his apprehension. Twelve years later, I find myself revisiting “what could have…

“They” Know Better

It was a spring evening in New York city when I met with my sisters of freelance in a partially black-owned establishment in Bedford Stuyvesant. The experience was disappointing to say the least, but eye-opening. The star of the conversation was a beautiful yet sef-depricating young black female who in a series of passive remarks…

“The Story of OJ” as the Theme Song to Pseudo Consciousness

Rapper Jay Z, who this piece will refer to by his given name Shawn Carter, provides a formidable discourse for contemporary “wokeness” on his new track “The Story of OJ.” Carter begins his popular new track “The Story of OJ” with the following: OJ’s like ‘I’m not black I’m OJ’ ‘Okay’ In a new track “The…

Why the Serena Williams Vanity Fair Cover Image Bothers Me

Aside from her bead- clad cornrow days, I have not seen Serena Williams on the court. Instead, I solely saw Williams on award shows where she seemed a caricatured version of a black female, clad in an unflattering, inauthentic hair fit for female impersonators and clothes that drew attention to her muscles, or physical hardness…

Dim Your Light Dark Girl: Invisibility and Black Femininity

After my first semester of teaching I was invited to meet with the department chair, a frumpy, middle aged- white woman who treated me like white retailers have my entire life–as if my presence depreciated the value of the company. She arrived over thirty minutes late for my meeting, a fact she would casually disregard…

The Angry Black Woman Part II: The Color of Criminality

Margaret Garner—a name unknown to many, encapsulates an early portrait of black female criminality. Garner, an enslaved black female subjected to cruel and frequent attacks on a southern plantation, planned an escape that would eliminate her and her family from the cruelty of her earthly master. She would never reach freedom, and upon her return…

Decrypting The Sociopathy of the Oppressed

Hollywood Whitney Elizabeth Houston was once a shining light of American culture. She was beautiful and unbelievably talented. Her voice possessed an unearthly perfection that serenaded the entire world. With songs like “How Will I know,” and “ I Want to Dance with somebody,” Houston was pop culture royalty. But her reign would eventually turn…

BET Award Highlights and Why BET is NOT for Black People

Before I continue, I feel obliged to mention that I refuse to watch this awards show since the network saw fit to invite non-black artists to perform and neglect to honor our fallen contributors. This post serves as an analysis of newsworthy moments and current propaganda surrounding the festivities of yesterday evening. Remy Ma Wins…

Remembering Michael Jackson

Despite his unmatched contribution to music, conversations surrounding the late but great Michael Jackson often speak of one or two things: His child molestation charges His desire to “unblacken” himself Ironically, it is Jackson’s reduction to the core traits as magnified by the white media that paints him as a portrait of a caricatured blackness….

A Week of Reflection: Remembering Juneteenth and The Charleston Shooting

This has been a reflective week for those of the black collective–commemorating Father’s Day, The Anniversary of the Charleston 9, and Juneteenth. Many celebrated the western capitalistic Father’s Day on Sunday, collectively forgetting about the blood spilled on this day two years ago. Sunday marked the second anniversary of the Charleston bible study shooting that…