Why Fade did not “Fade” The Hyper-Sexualized Black Female Image

Teyana Taylor resurfaced as a cultural phenomenon in Kanye West’s latest creation “Fade.” Although the creator of 2009’s “Google Me,” many have not googled Taylor in years. Not exactly a forgotten presence, Taylor launched her own company, and graced the music world with the occasional feature, maintaining a private yet modestly popular Hollywood status.  Flash […]

Beyonce’s Lemonade-More Sour than Sweet

“Becky with the good hair” shields an ignorant comment with the facade of entertainment–rendering blacks pawns in their own oppression. As pawns, fans overlook this problematic phrasing, and instead focus on unveiling Becky’s identity. In prompting listeners to place a face to the phrase rather than question its relevance, the toxic phrase “good hair” endures celebration rather than the scrutiny it deserves.

“Nina” as a Contemporary Lynching of a Legend

The Whispers of Womanism initially commented on the casting choice for the upcoming Nina Simone biopic when the news first made headlines. While the weight of the tragedy seemed in full flight upon this announcement, seeing the trailer enhanced any and all ominous feelings provoked in the announcement.   In the “Nina” trailer viewers see […]

Beyonce as Black Conscious?

My consistent criticism of popular culture is its often indifference to contemporary conflict. Admittedly Hollywood offers starlets, singers and others of the same sort a view from the top that all too frequently distances them from reality. Reality, well specifically speaking- black reality observes a prominent presence in Superstar Beyonce’s latest video Formation. While the […]

Viola Davis, and The Bittersweetness of Black Presence in Traditionally White Spaces

My eyes welt up with tears as Davis, beautifully dressed in an ivory gown with her hair unapolegitcally natural, took the stage to accept her honor. The tears were partially of pride, but mainly because Davis’ win is merely another symbol to seduce society into believing the world “isn’t so bad” for black folk.

Remembering Amelia Boyton Robinson, The Last of a Dying Breed

On Wednesday, the world lost one of its most courageous spirits- Amelia Boyton Robinson. While her one hundred and four years sounds plentiful to most, the melancholy feelings that linger in her absence marks the tragedy of a breed that is literally dying or dead.        Boyton Robinson was a pivotal presence in […]

The Convenience of Sisters and Suicide: A Discussion of Sandra Bland and Bobbi Kristina

While the untimely loss of these two young ladies hurts many, white media personifies their indifference in their attempts to scorn the legacy of both women with whispers of suicide. Talk of suicide with regard to the black female body is not only blasphemy but it makes a mockery of the systematic racism that murdered both young women.